Customer Care Tip – Use the Customer’s Name

I am a solutions support analyst for a Fortune 500 privately held company. My expertise in technical customer service is recognized by my customers, co-workers, and employer. How is it recognized? I was named team member of the year for the enterprise for providing exception technical customer service. Three other times I was a nominee for the team member of the year. I provide what I call world-class customer service. I identify their problem’s root causes and provide solutions. I make the customer’s day better.

Customer Care Tip – Use the customer’s name.

Customers come to me for one of two reasons.

  1. They need help getting something fixed that isn’t working.
  2. They need to know how to do something (or how to avoid doing something).

They call me to get them from where they are to where they need to be. They expect me to make it happen in the shortest amount of time. They expect little disruption to their business. They do not want blamed for the current problem.

They call engaging my expertise and my access/availability to needed resources. They are investing their time and energy. They expect a good return on their investment of time. They expect to get what they called for.

I love assisting in resolving their problems. No one comes to see me or call me unless they have issues. I start by asking them how I can make their day better. I know they have a problem. I ask them tell me how I can help.

I calm distressed callers by using their name. That helps them know I am listening and that they are not just another number. Another way I cut their stress is to repeat their issue back to them. For example, “Mr. Smith I understand your sales data is not up to date. We have not updated it in 7 days. Is that correct?” If I have misunderstood I guarantee they tell me at this point.

Next I give them my name and my telephone number as the point of contact on the issue. I outline the steps I will take in troubleshooting. I give them a specific time when I will call time back with an update. I normally do that within the hour. If they call me at 8:15 AM I tell them I will call you back by 9 AM with an update on your issue. At 9 AM I call them back! The issue may not be resolved, but by then I usually know what the issue is and steps to resolution with a projected resolution day and time.

My customers like me making a promise of calling them back. I give them permission to call me if they need and update. They can call if they feel I am too slow. I also offer to update their boss if they feel that will help.

I have found assuring my customers helps build credibility. I consistently do this with every person. This really helps with the engagement and adoption of our products and services. And I never forget to tell them thank you.

Customer Care Tip – Use the customer’s name.

Jimmie Aaron Kepler

Jimmie Aaron Kepler’s work has appeared in six different Lifeway Christian publications as well as The Baptist Program, Thinking About Suicide.com, Poetry & Prose Magazine, vox poetica, The Dead Mule School of Southern Literature, Bewildering Stories, Beyond Imagination Literary Magazine and more. His short stories The Cup, Invasion of the Prairie Dogs, Miracle at the Gibson Farm: A Christmas Story, and The Paintings as well as Gone Electric: A Poetry Collection are available on Amazon.com.

Author: Jimmie Aaron Kepler, Ed.D.

Jimmie Aaron Kepler is a full-time writer. He was born in San Antonio, Texas, to a career military father and stay at home mother. He lived in six states and attended eight different schools before graduating high school. He earned a Bachelor of Arts in History with minors in English and Military Science from The University of Texas at Arlington, Master of Arts and Master of Religious Education degrees from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, as well as the Doctor of Education degree. Before writing full-time, he worked as a US Army officer for 10-years, religious educator for 18-years, and as an IT software application engineer for over 20-years. He is a widower. He lives in North Texas with his cat Lacey.