Thoughts on Why I Wrote Rebuider

RebuilderMy Bible Fellowship Class was studying the book Nehemiah during the summer of 2014. I had taught it several times when during my years working as an associate pastor. More importantly, I enjoyed the leadership princip00les that filled the book’s thirteen chapters. 

About the same time, I was getting rejection after rejection on a book manuscript; I was shopping. Agent and editors were saying my post civil war historical fiction was well written. However, my civil war/post civil war books just don’t sell. I was told there was a best a small niche market and at worst no market. The simply couldn’t take the risk.

Their suggestion was I use the book as a learning experience. It did prove I could write a full novel. It showed I had the ability to see a project through to completion.

The question became, what would I write?

I always loved science fiction. I also love the Bible and the great stories of faith. I thought why not combine the two?  What about a loosely based retelling of the book of Nehemiah set in the future. Let me emphasize this is not a strict retelling of the book of Nehemiah, but using some of the events and plot line plus imagination to create a story of Christianity’s demise, revival, Mars colonization and first contact with an alien human race. Rebuilder has thirteen chapter just like the book of Nehemiah.

Can a race of human beings from another planet be alien? Great question that I am still answering as I continue to write the series.

I’ll write more about the book in the days ahead.


Jimmie Aaron Kepler is a novelist, poet, book reviewer, and award-winning short story writer. His work has appeared in over twenty venues, including Bewildering Stories and Beyond Imagination. When not writing each morning at his favorite coffeehouse, he supports his writing, reading, and book reviewing habit working as an IT application support analyst. He is a former Captain in the US Army. His blog Kepler’s Book Reviews was named a 100 best blogs for history buffs. You can visit him at http://www.jimmiekepler.com.

The Rebuilder

RebuilderA power resurrected after a 200 years absence. A man called to save humankind on Mars.

Earth’s moon. A staff colonel receives a diplomatic pouch. Its message demands he come to Mars. He is the last hope to save human colonization on the red planet.

Eradication of religion occurred in the twenty-second century. Now in the twenty-fourth century, Christianity has been miraculously reborn. All are not pleased with its revival. The opponents begin a crusade to destroy religion. The attacks occur where the rebirth started, The Rain Dome on Mars. These enemies threaten humankind’s colonization and presence on Mars.

Dr. Elizabeth Ashworth believes God will use her former husband, Colonel Harry Ashworth, to save the red planet’s colonization and The Rain Dome. Harry must face his most visceral fears: public speaking, commanding troops, and his ex-wife.

Can Harry overcome his self-doubt and constant quarreling with his ex-wife to rebuilt The Rain Dome? Can Christian worship be reestablished or will religion finally be wiped out? Will he be the Rebuilder?

Inspired by the Holy Bible’s book of Nehemiah, “Rebuilder” is book one of the space opera “Liberator Series” by Jimmie Aaron Kepler. It is a science fiction adventure where belief in God collides with those determined to wipe out all religious systems.

Rebuilder: Book 1 Liberator Series (Book 1 in the LIBERATOR space opera series) by Jimmie Aaron Kepler is available on Amazon. Order or Preview REBUILDER.


Jimmie Aaron Kepler is a novelist, poet, book reviewer, and award-winning short story writer. His work has appeared in over twenty venues, including Bewildering Stories and Beyond Imagination. When not writing each morning at his favorite coffeehouse, he supports his writing, reading, and book reviewing habit working as an IT application support analyst. He is a former Captain in the US Army. His blog Kepler’s Book Reviews was named a 100 best blogs for history buffs. You can visit him at http://www.jimmiekepler.com.

Hollow Heroes: An Unvarnished Look at the Wartime Careers of Churchill, Montgomery and Mountbatten

Hollow HeroesHollow Heroes: An Unvarnished Look at the Wartime Careers of Churchill, Montgomery, and Mountbatten by Michael Arnold opens the curtain where the reader can see beyond the spin and public relations images given to learn the “unvarnished” stories of the three men.

Churchill, Montgomery, and Mountbatten were three of Great Britain’s key leaders during and following World War Two. I remember Churchill being credited with the comment that history would be kind to him because he intended to write it. Yet, when researching I only find at best, “According to some accounts he (Churchill) told Stalin and Roosevelt at the 1943 Tehran Conference that ‘History will judge us kindly,’ and, when asked how he could be so confident, he replied: ‘because I shall write the history’ (which he did, of course, in a massive tome on the Second World War). Other accounts have Churchill saying in 1948 in a House of Commons Speech: ‘For my part, I consider that it will be found much better by all Parties to leave the past to history, especially as I propose to write that history.’ In both cases, the spirit of the misquotation is very much evident, albeit in rather different contexts. And it’s entirely likely that intending to ‘write history’ was the kind of clever double entendre to which Churchill might willingly have referred more than once.” My point – Churchill wanted to make sure his spin was the one remembered. (Source: http://eganhistory.com/2012/10/30/on-doing-history-empathy-accuracy-in-the-undergraduate-classroom/).

The book unveils the truths behind their public images. Arnold’s book shows a different view of each man. His approach is demonstrating a large part resume is inaccurately being built on false results, chicanery, and deceit.

The author looks at the influence and obstruction of officers who obtained their rank based on their “social class”. He demonstrates the negative impact of “class-based officers” on the performance of the British Army in World War II. He quotes the views of the Americans that saw far too often the British failed to base officer promotion on effectiveness. Instead, it was on social background. Conforming was more important to the British.

Montgomery’s fear of and jealously of Patton is clearly shown.

Churchill’s self-preservation attitude and bungling are shown in his handling of Field Marshals Wavell and Auchinleck, two of Britain’s finest commanders of the war. Their service was largely lost to Britain because of Churchill’s constant interfering in field matters especially after the fall of Singapore.

Arnold includes the case of Major-General Dorman-Smith. Dorman-Smith was one of Britain’s most brilliant original thinkers. Sacked by Churchill for what appears to be his overachievement as the tactician who had produced Britain’s victory over Rommel at the first battle of Alamein, This was an inexcusable sin in some eyes.

Mountbatten’s fumbling in India is also accurately portrayed. It shows the “man for the century’s” overly embellished reputation.


Jimmie Aaron Kepler is a novelist, poet, book reviewer, and award-winning short story writer. His work has appeared in over twenty venues, including Bewildering Stories and Beyond Imagination. When not writing each morning at his favorite coffeehouse, he supports his writing, reading, and book reviewing habit working as an IT application support analyst. He is a former Captain in the US Army. His blog Kepler’s Book Reviews was named a 100 best blogs for history buffs. You can visit him at http://www.jimmiekepler.com.

Pioneer Plaza and Texas Longhorns

Texas Longhorns in downtown Dallas, Texas
Texas Longhorns in downtown Dallas, Texas

Pioneer Plaza:
Located just north of the Dallas Convention Center is Pioneer Plaza. It is a large public park in the Convention Center District of downtown Dallas, Texas. The centerpiece of the Pioneer Plaza is large sculptures. It is a heavily visited tourist site. Located next to Pioneer Park Cemetery, which features the Confederate War Memorial, the two offer the largest public open space in Dallas’ central business district.

Background of Pioneer Plaza:
The land was once railroad and warehouse property. Built on land cleared as part of the failed Griffin Square development, developer Trammel Crow gets credit for the idea behind the sculptures and plaza. He wanted an iconic “Western” sculpture in the City of Dallas. He assembled a group to give the sculptures. The project started in 1992, at a total cost of $9,000,000.00. Built on 4.2 acres of land donated by the City of Dallas, $4,800,000.00 of the cost came from private funds raised from individuals and local businesses.

Sculpture:
The large sculpture celebrates the nineteenth-century cattle drives that took place along the Shawnee Trail. It was the earliest and easternmost route by which Texas longhorn cattle moved to northern railheads. The trail passed through Austin, Waco, and Dallas until the Chisholm Trail siphoned off most of the traffic in 1867.

Artist Robert Summers of Glen Rose, Texas created 70 bronze steers and three trail riders sculptures. Each steer is larger-than-life at six feet high. Altogether the sculpture is the largest bronze monument of its kind in the world. Set along an artificial ridge, man-made limestone cliff the native landscaping with a flowing stream and waterfall creates a dramatic effect.

Maintained by the adjacent Dallas Convention Center, Pioneer Plaza is the second most visited tourist attraction in downtown Dallas.

Source:

Creative Commons License

Pioneer Plaza by Wikipedia and Jimmie A. Kepler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Based on a work at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pioneer_Plaza.

The photograph was taken in Dallas, Texas USA by Jimmie A. Kepler in December 2008.

Creative Commons License

Texas Longhorns in downtown Dallas, Texas by Jimmie A. Kepler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at https://www.dropbox.com/s/6u5jvbvtdlc08k8/100_1613.jpg.